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Relationship Between CMJ and Squat Jump Measures Amongst Elite Female Football and Rugby Players

The International Journal of Strength and Conditioning is the world's first in S&C and Sport Science to be 'Diamond' Open Access. We have recently published a new article by Joe Collins, John K. Parker, Mark McKean, Luke Hogarth, Geoff P. Lovell titled, "Examining the Relationship Between Countermovement and Squat Jump Measures Amongst Elite Development Female Football and Rugby Players"

Abstract

Purpose: In response to the need for a single low cost, relatively quick, minimally invasive test of strength, power, and velocity for elite development standard female football and rugby players requiring minimal staff expertise and sophisticated equipment, with benchmark standards, this study had two aims. Firstly, how countermovement jump (CMJ) and squat jump (SJ) tests associate with commonly used football and rugby strength and velocity tests. Secondly, to propose benchmark standards for elite development level female football and rugby players.


Methods: Participants were 60 elite development level female football and rugby players. Data were collected as part of the participants’ elite pathway development academy programs. Measures included absolute lower body strength (ALS) assessed using three repetition maximum (3RM) trap bar deadlift, relative lower body strength (ALS / body weight), CMJ and SJ using bodyweight only, and running sprint velocities over 10 m and 40 m.


Results: For the football sample, CMJ and SJ had significant relationships with RLS (r=0.496, p<0.01 and r=0.499, p<.01 respectively) and 10 m sprint velocity (r=0.579, p<0.001 and r=0.481, p<0.01 respectively), but not with ALS nor 40 m sprint velocity. For the rugby sample, CMJ and SJ also had significant associations with RLS (r=0.539, p<0.01 and r=0.449, p<.05 respectively) and 10 m sprint velocity (r=0.742, p<0.001 and r=0.797, p<0.001 respectively), as well as with 40 m sprint velocity (r=0.598, p<0.01 and r=0.651, p<0.001 respectively).


Conclusion: CMJ and SJ represent low cost, relatively quick, minimally invasive tests of strength, power, and velocity suitable for elite development standard female football and rugby players’ performance assessment, benchmarking, and monitoring.


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